2020 Consumer Notice of Tap Water Results for Lead and Copper at Keene Elementary School

The River View Local School District recently collected the 2020 water samples to check for lead and copper.  The samples were collected at the Keene Elementary School building.  This building has a public water system responsible for providing drinking water that meets state and federal standards. The results concluded that this building meets state and federal standards.  The test results are as follows

2020 Keene Elementary Notice of Tap Water

Lead and Copper Results

Keene Elementary School is a public water system (PWS) responsible for providing drinking water that meets state and federal standards. Drinking water samples for lead and copper were collected at these location and the results are:

Amount of Lead in Water:  <5 ug/L   Boys restroom sink 1st floor                6/2/2020

                                               <5 ug/L   Kitchen sink 1st floor                             6/2/2020

                                               <5 ug/L   Girls restroom sink 2nd floor                6/2/2020

                                               <5 ug/L   Staff restroom sink 1st floor                 6/2/2020

                                               <5 ug/L   Tudor room restroom sink 2nd floor    6/2/2020

Action Level for Lead:          15 micrograms per liter (µg/L)

The System’s Water  90th percentile for Lead are Less than 15 µg/L.

Amount of Copper in Water:   63 ug/L  Boys restroom sink 1st floor            6/2/2020

                                                    66 ug/L  Kitchen sink 1st floor                         6/2/2020

                                                    64 ug/L  Girls restroom sink 2nd floor            6/2/2020

                                                   106 ug/L Staff restroom sink 1st floor             6/2/2020

                                                   68 ug/L    Tudor room restroom 2nd floor       6/2/2020

Action Level for Copper:      1300 micrograms per liter (µg/L)

The System’s Water 90th percentile for Copper is Less than 1300 µg/L.

What Does This Mean?

Under the authority of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the action level for lead in drinking water at 15 micrograms per liter (µg/L).  This means PWSs must ensure that water from taps used for human consumption do not exceed this level in at least 90 percent of the sites sampled (90th percentile value).  The action level is the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a PWS must follow. 

In 2018, Ohio EPA established the threshold level for lead in drinking water at 15 ug/L. The lead threshold level is the concentration of lead in an individual tap water sample which, if exceeded, triggers additional notification requirements for those served by the tap sampled. Additionally, if a sample exceeds the lead threshold level, the associated tap must be removed from service.

Because lead may pose serious health risks, the EPA established a Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) of zero for lead.  The MCLG is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health, allowing for a margin of safety.

What are the Health Effects of Lead?

Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources.  It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body.  The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women.  Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children.  Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults.  Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in life.  During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother’s bones, which may affect brain development.

What are the Health Effects of Lead?

Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other sources.  It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body.  The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women.  Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children.  Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults.  Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in life.  During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the mother’s bones, which may affect brain development.

What are the Health Effects of Copper?

Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water containing copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson's disease should consult their personal doctor.

Where Can I Get Health Screenings and Testing of Blood Lead Levels?   

Information about Health Screenings are available through the Ohio Department of Health’s Ohio Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program.  They can be contacted at 246 N High St. Columbus, OH 43215 / 614-728-4115 / 1-877- LEAD-SAFE / www.odh.ohio.gov / kelly.harris@odh.ohio.gov 

What Can I Do to Reduce Exposure to Lead if Found in My Drinking Water?

Run your water to flush out lead.  If water has not been used for several hours, run water for thirty seconds to two minutes before using it for drinking or cooking.  This helps flush any lead in the water that may have leached from the plumbing.

Use cold water for cooking and preparing baby formula.  Do not cook with, drink water, or make baby formula from the hot water tap.  Lead dissolves more easily in hot water.

Do not boil water to remove lead.  Boiling water will not reduce lead.

What are the Sources of Lead?

Lead is unusual among drinking water contaminants in that it seldom occurs naturally in water supplies like rivers and lakes.  Lead enters drinking water primarily as a result of corrosion, or wearing away, of materials containing lead in the plumbing.  Buildings built prior to 1986 are more likely to have lead pipes, fixtures, and solder. New buildings can also be at risk, since even legally ‘lead-free’ plumbing may contain up to 8 percent lead.  The most common problem is with brass or chrome-plated brass fixtures which can leach significant amounts of lead into water, especially hot water.

What are the Sources of Copper?

Copper is a metal that occurs naturally in rock, soil, plants, animals, and water. Since copper is easily shaped or molded, it is commonly used to make electrical wiring, and household plumbing materials. Copper may be combined with other metals to make brass and bronze pipes and faucets. Copper compounds are also used as agricultural pesticides and to control algae in lakes and reservoirs. All living organisms including humans need copper to survive; therefore, a trace amount of copper in our diet is necessary for good health. However, some forms of copper or excess amounts can also cause health problems.

The level of copper in surface and groundwater is generally very low. High levels of copper may get into the environment through mining, farming, manufacturing operations, and municipal or industrial wastewater releases into rivers and lakes. Copper can get into drinking water either by directly contaminating well water or through corrosion of copper pipes if your water is acidic. Corrosion of pipes is by far the greatest cause for concern.

For More Information, Please Contact: Roger Boatman 740-824-3521; visit US EPA’s Web site at www.epa.gov/lead; call the National Lead Information Center at 800-424-LEAD; or contact your health care provider.

 

 

 

 

 

 





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